Ky. Gov. Orders Marriage Licenses Without Clerk Names

"County clerks should not have to compromise their consciences", Bevin said, after a federal judge jailed Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis for contempt of court following her refusal to issue marriage licenses to same sex couples. Davis contended that issuing licenses to same-sex couples violated her religious freedom, because Kentucky state law mandates that the name of elected county clerks appear on the licenses - which Davis argued was a form of endorsement of those marriages.

Bevin's executive order makes nameless licenses standard statewide. And they opened Davis up to criticism for her personal life, including the revelation that she had been married three times, which some said made her a hypocrite.

Matt Bevin issued an executive order removing county clerks' names from marriage licenses on Tuesday, December 23, 2015.

Before leaving office, Beshear issued an executive order automatically restoring the voting rights of convicted felons who had completed their sentences and did not have any pending charges or restitution orders.

"This move by Gov. Bevin is a step backward for many hard working Kentuckians who have seen their wages remain flat despite a growing economy", Kenny Colston, spokesman for the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy, said the order was a "step backward" for workers. U.S. District Judge David Bunning then put Davis in jail and ordered her deputy clerks to issue the licenses.

Bevin issued the executive order to shield county clerks such as Kim Davis.

Ida Mae Astute/ABC Davis was jailed in September because she refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

"It's never been mine or anyone else's intentions as far as I'm concerned to deny anybody a right that they feel that they have - but it has always been my intention that mine are not denied in the process", said Casey Davis.

Kentucky is not the only state taken by surprise with the June Supreme Court ruling, but some states with overturned bans on same-sex marriage have done a better job balancing the accommodations than others.

The order does not affect anyone who has already had their rights restored. The current minimum wage is $7.25 an hour. "Wage rates ideally would be established by the demands of the labor market instead of being set by the government".

"The big takeaway from this is that effective immediately all vacant positions in any state agency will be reviewed to ascertain if the positions are necessary "...to the maintenance of essential government services".

Neither Davis nor her attorneys at the social conservative legal firm Liberty Counsel responded to the Washington Blade's request to comment on the governor's executive order. Bunning has not made a decision yet.

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